Reviews Arrival about the recent surge of personal stories

Reviews Arrival about the recent surge of personal stories

Arrival -

Much has been written about the recent surge of personal stories being told through the horror genre in films like “It Follows,”
“The Witch” and “The Babadook,” but there’s an equally interesting trend in the science fiction genre as well.
Over the last few years, we’ve seen the genre used not only to examine the power of space travel or a post-apocalyptic future
but as a way to address common humanity more than futuristic adventure stories. Joining films like “Gravity,”
“Interstellar” and “The Martian” is Denis Villeneuve’s ambitious and moving “ Arrival ,”
a movie that’s about the day the universe changed forever but becomes more focused on a single story even as it’s expanding its worldwide narrative.

It is more about grief, time, communication and compassion than it is warp speed, and it’s a film that asks questions.

How do we approach that which terrifies us? Why is it important to communicate through language and not action?

The final act of “ Arrival ” gets to the big ideas of life that I won’t spoil here, but viewers should know that Villeneuve’s film is not the crowdpleaser of “The Martian,” Ridley Scott’s big TIFF premiere last year.

It’s a movie designed to simultaneously challenge viewers,

move them and get them talking. For the most part, it succeeds.

Amy Adams gives a confident, affecting performance as Louise,

a linguistics expert brought in on the day that 12 unidentified flying objects enter Earth’s orbit.

Despite what they’re telling the public—which is not much of anything at first—the governments of the world have made first contact with the creatures inside,

beings that look vaguely like some higher power merged an octopus with a giant hand.

Working with the military and a scientist named Ian (Jeremy Renner), Louise seeks to find the answer อ่านต่อ

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