The first time we see Michael Keaton in his tighty-whities in “Birdman”

BIRDMAN (or, THE UNEXPECTED VIRTUE OF IGNORANCE) | Wordless Music

The first time we see Michael Keaton in his tighty-whities in “Birdman”
it’s from behind. His character, a formerly high-flying movie star, is sitting in the lotus position in his dressing room of a historic Broadway theatre, only he’s levitating above the ground.
Bathed in sunlight streaming in from an open window, he looks peaceful.
But a voice inside his head is growling, grumbling,
gnawing at him grotesquely about matters both large and small.
The next time we see Keaton in his tighty-whities in “Birdman,”

he’s dashing frantically through Times Square at night, having accidentally locked himself out of that same theatre in the middle of a performance of a Raymond Carver production that he stars in, wrote and directed.

He’s swimming upstream through a river of gawking tourists, autograph seekers, food carts and street performers.

But despite the chaos that surrounds him, he seems purposeful, driven and–for the first time–oddly content.

These are the extremes that director Alejandro G. Inarritu navigates with audacious ambition and spectacular skill

in “Birdman”–the full title of which is “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance).”

He’s made a film that’s both technically astounding yet emotionally rich, intimate yet enormous, biting yet warm, satirical yet sweet. It’s also the first time that Inarritu, the director of ponderous downers like

“Babel” and “Biutiful,” actually seems to be having some fun.

Make that a ton of fun.

“Birdman” is a complete blast from start to finish. The gimmick here–and it’s a doozy,

and it works beautifully–is that Inarritu has created the sensation that you are watching a two-hour film shot all in one take. Working with the brilliant and inventive cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki (who won an Oscar this year for shooting

“Gravity” for Inarritu’s close friend and fellow Mexican director Alfonso Cuaron), อ่านต่อ

Reviews Arrival about the recent surge of personal stories

Reviews Arrival about the recent surge of personal stories

Arrival -

Much has been written about the recent surge of personal stories being told through the horror genre in films like “It Follows,”
“The Witch” and “The Babadook,” but there’s an equally interesting trend in the science fiction genre as well.
Over the last few years, we’ve seen the genre used not only to examine the power of space travel or a post-apocalyptic future
but as a way to address common humanity more than futuristic adventure stories. Joining films like “Gravity,”
“Interstellar” and “The Martian” is Denis Villeneuve’s ambitious and moving “ Arrival ,”
a movie that’s about the day the universe changed forever but becomes more focused on a single story even as it’s expanding its worldwide narrative.

It is more about grief, time, communication and compassion than it is warp speed, and it’s a film that asks questions.

How do we approach that which terrifies us? Why is it important to communicate through language and not action?

The final act of “ Arrival ” gets to the big ideas of life that I won’t spoil here, but viewers should know that Villeneuve’s film is not the crowdpleaser of “The Martian,” Ridley Scott’s big TIFF premiere last year.

It’s a movie designed to simultaneously challenge viewers,

move them and get them talking. For the most part, it succeeds.

Amy Adams gives a confident, affecting performance as Louise,

a linguistics expert brought in on the day that 12 unidentified flying objects enter Earth’s orbit.

Despite what they’re telling the public—which is not much of anything at first—the governments of the world have made first contact with the creatures inside,

beings that look vaguely like some higher power merged an octopus with a giant hand.

Working with the military and a scientist named Ian (Jeremy Renner), Louise seeks to find the answer อ่านต่อ

Frozen Review Princess Elsa (Menzel) can create snow

Frozen Review Princess Elsa (Menzel) can create snow

Frozen 2 | Disney Movies | Thailand

Princess Elsa (Menzel) can create snow, and as a child she accidentally injures her sister Anna (Bell). She tries to control her gift, but when her power is revealed at her coronation, she flees in panic — plunging the kingdom into eternal winter. Anna must go after her and find a way to undo the spell.
Disney has always taken a fast and loose approach to adapting classic fairy tales, adding dragons to Sleeping Beauty, talking crabs to The Little Mermaid and dancing teapots to Beauty And The Beast. But their adaptations also have distinct phases: there were the early,
faintly Germanic fantasies; the lacklustre ’80s and the feisty ’90s princesses. Now we’re in the Tangled era, notable for big Broadway numbers,
large quadrupeds that act like canines and adjectival titles that don’t mention the heroine.
The result here is that a story about two sisters — powerful, scared Elsa (Idina Menzel) and good-hearted Anna (Kristen Bell) — is planted in,
and occasionally obscured by, an almost entirely male supporting cast.
The emotional moments are powered by the bond between the manga-looking, wasp-waisted sisters — their eyes literally bigger than their stomachs —
but the comedy comes largely from the buddy relationships between the guys, heroic ice-harvester Kristoff (Jonathan Groff),
dog-like reindeer Sven and sentient snowman Olaf (Josh Gad).
It’s a division of labour that leaves the very funny Anna playing second fiddle and Elsa’s struggle to either control her powers or revel in them sidelined for long stretches, undermining the finale. หนัง hd